Session Type: Paper Session
Program Session: 15 | Submission: 17385 | Sponsor(s): (OB)
Virtual session type: Synchronous Live Open
Scheduled: Friday, Jul 30 2021 7:00AM - 8:30AM ET (UTC-4)
 
Feedback and Knowledge Sharing Research

Digital Session Chair: Xiaode Ji, Guanghua School of Management, Peking U.
OB: How Information Advantage Influences Employee Voice Behavior
Author: Xiaode Ji, Guanghua School of Management, Peking U.
Author: Jiang XU, Ph.D Candidate in Organizational Behavior
Although information is the premise of voice, the role of information plays in voice literature is less understood. In this study, we introduce the concept of voicer information advantage over peers to explore how information functions in the context of voice. Specifically, by incorporating the perspectives of self-interest behavior and voice as a planned behavior theory, we propose that employees possessing voice-related information advantage over their peers are motivated to voice by expected benefits brought to themselves. Moreover, this effect is particularly likely to exist in a cooperative rather than competitive team. An experiment employing a scenario task was designed to test our hypotheses. Data from 135 participants supported our hypotheses. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
Paper is No Longer Available Online: Please contact the author(s).
OB: The relationship between psychological ownership and knowledge sharing
Author: Daeho Kim, Sungkyunkwan U.
Author: Jiseon Shin, Sungkyunkwan U.
Despite great attention to the effectiveness of psychological ownership in organizations, its relationship with knowledge sharing has been barely understood with theoretical and empirical evidence. There are inconsistent theoretical predictions and empirical results on the relationship between psychological ownership and knowledge sharing. To clarify the relationship, we apply social identity theory to theorize that psychological ownership experiences a significant psychological mechanism. We posit that organization based psychological ownership (OBPO) and job based psychological ownership (JBPO) can influence knowledge sharing differently through identification with coworkers. Additionally, we propose that diversity climate can amplify or suppress the effects of psychological ownership on knowledge sharing. Using a two-wave study design, we examined the distinctive roles of diversity climate in the relationship between psychological ownership and knowledge sharing. With this study, we highlight that the relationship between psychological ownership and knowledge sharing is dependent on employees’ social identity surrounding ownership targets and diversity climate.
Paper is No Longer Available Online: Please contact the author(s).
OB: The Expert Paradox: How Team Member Expertise Impacts Leaders’ Information Integration
Author: Stephen Sauer, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
Author: Matthew Rodgers, Hope College
Author: Melissa C. Thomas-Hunt, Vanderbilt U.
Today’s organizations have come to view and to use workplace teams as information processors, making the ability to manage knowledge and expertise an essential pre-requisite for effective group decisions. Consequently, an important mandate for leaders of information processing groups is to determine an approach that most benefits the group. This paper addresses this critical area by focusing on the structural and social factors affecting leaders’ behavior when guiding group decisions. Specifically, the research considers the effects of power distribution (i.e., location of expertise) on leaders’ choice to contribute their own unique knowledge or to integrate others’ information. The paper proposes that leaders do not always serve as information integrators, but may instead compete with their team members by focusing on their own position rather than promoting consideration of others’ knowledge. In addition, leaders’ perceptions of threat may mediate this result. Data from two experimental studies support these hypotheses.
Paper is No Longer Available Online: Please contact the author(s).
OB: How Team-Level Performance Feedback Influences Peer-Evaluations: A Social Comparison Perspective
Author: Gerhard Speckbacher, WU Vienna U. of Economics and Business
Author: Martin Wiernsperger, WU Vienna U. of Economics and Business
Teamwork promises important benefits, especially when it comes to complex problem solving. However, the lack of reliable performance measures at the individual team member level makes the management of team performance challenging. While information from peer monitoring during task completion is a valuable source of knowledge on individual contributions, such information tends to be biased. This paper analyzes how positive or negative feedback on overall team outcomes influences team members’ perceptions of their own and other team members’ relative contribution to overall team performance. Building on social comparison theory, we propose that individuals tend to use same gender peers as social reference points and positive versus negative team-level feedback has an impact on individuals’ (unconscious) strategies for enhancing self-esteem. Overall, we hypothesize that positive (negative) team-level performance feedback leads to a shift of relative contribution ratings towards lower (higher) evaluations of peers that share the evaluator’s gender. We test our hypotheses in an experiment with 247 student participants and find evidence to support our hypotheses.
Paper is No Longer Available Online: Please contact the author(s).
  
KEY TO SYMBOLS Teaching-oriented Teaching-oriented   Practice-oriented Practice-oriented   International-oriented International-oriented   Theme-oriented Theme-oriented   Research-oriented Research-oriented   Teaching-oriented Diversity-oriented
Selected as a Best Paper Selected as a Best Paper